Sep 20, 2014
10 notes
miyaando:

#miyaando #solo exhibition #sundaramtagore #oct 16- nov 17 @offthehookuk @offthehookmag #thankyou

Love her work. Wish I could see her show.

miyaando:

#miyaando #solo exhibition #sundaramtagore #oct 16- nov 17 @offthehookuk @offthehookmag #thankyou

Love her work. Wish I could see her show.

Sep 20, 2014
34 notes
lowmorale:

Serpentine by Richard Serra, 1993

lowmorale:

Serpentine by Richard Serra, 1993

(via windinthedust)

Sep 19, 2014
12 notes
Anonymous asked: but are you anti-islam?

rikaorlanda:

not exactly. Whatever religion you have, and whatever God your worship if it works for you and gives you hope/support fine. However  I’m against state-driven religion, forced upon people by let’s say schools/legal courts etc. To force people to behave/act/live in a certain way, or to deny people certain rights (like abortion/education/driving lessons/same sex marriages etc etc) because of religion is imo oppression.  But in this case I don’t think  the religion is not so important, it’s about the actions really. 

Sep 17, 2014
534 notes

(Source: CKND, via thomortiz)

Sep 17, 2014
17,488 notes
workman:

prints:
The Falling Man is a photograph taken by Associated Press photographer Richard Drew, of a man falling from the North Tower of the World Trade Center during the September 11 attacks in New York City. The subject of the image—whose identity remains uncertain but is speculated to be that of Jonathan Briley — was one of the people trapped on the upper floors of the skyscraper who apparently either fell as they searched for safety or jumped to escape the fire and smoke. At least 200 people fell or jumped to their deaths that day.
Regarding the social and cultural significance of The Falling Man, theologian Mark D. Thompson says that “perhaps the most powerful image of despair at the beginning of the twenty-first century is not found in art, or literature, or even popular music. It is found in a single photograph.”

…….but photographing a person is different from photographing a landscape scene. This sums up everything about 9/11

workman:

prints:

The Falling Man is a photograph taken by Associated Press photographer Richard Drew, of a man falling from the North Tower of the World Trade Center during the September 11 attacks in New York City. The subject of the image—whose identity remains uncertain but is speculated to be that of Jonathan Briley — was one of the people trapped on the upper floors of the skyscraper who apparently either fell as they searched for safety or jumped to escape the fire and smoke. At least 200 people fell or jumped to their deaths that day.

Regarding the social and cultural significance of The Falling Man, theologian Mark D. Thompson says that “perhaps the most powerful image of despair at the beginning of the twenty-first century is not found in art, or literature, or even popular music. It is found in a single photograph.”

…….but photographing a person is different from photographing a landscape scene. This sums up everything about 9/11

Sep 17, 2014
227 notes
justjulespictures:

justjulespictures:

Anything simple always interests me.~ David Hockney


Someone explain tumble on?

justjulespictures:

justjulespictures:

Anything simple always interests me.
~ David Hockney

Someone explain tumble on?

Sep 17, 2014
213 notes
inneroptics:

ROBERT MAPPLETHORPE


Love this because the first thing I thought on seeing the photograph was, ” where are the chips?”

inneroptics:

ROBERT MAPPLETHORPE

Love this because the first thing I thought on seeing the photograph was, ” where are the chips?”

(via ierac)

Sep 17, 2014
28 notes
Guibert writes about the difference between photography and writing, and I think he absolutely puts his finger on what that difference is. When you take a photograph (and I’m paraphrasing Guibert here) you end up with an image, but all of the emotion that was present when you were taking it is kind of transmuted into something else. It’s become an object, and it could be a very beautiful object and a successful photograph, but in a lot of ways it eclipses the original feeling. He says it will have become foreign to him. Whereas if he writes it (the scene, the desire, the failure), he actually retains the emotional trace. He says that writing is melancholic, and that’s why it can preserve the feeling, the loss, in a way the image can’t.
Moyra Davey (via bombmagazine)

This is exactly why I can’t photograph beautiful landscapes. I always feel let down somehow.

Sep 17, 2014
1,075 notes
workman:

flasd:
Andy Warhol
Oxidation Painting, 1978


I didn’t know this about Andy Warhol

workman:

flasd:

Andy Warhol

Oxidation Painting, 1978

I didn’t know this about Andy Warhol

(Source: thecricketchirps, via thomortiz)

Sep 16, 2014
2 notes

aga khan museum by fumihiko maki showcases muslim heritage in toronto

Sep 14, 2014
152 notes
acidadebranca:

 Filippo Juvarra | Palace of Venaria (Turin, Italy) | 1729

acidadebranca:

 Filippo Juvarra | Palace of Venaria (Turin, Italy) | 1729

(Source: dyingofcute, via thomortiz)

Sep 14, 2014
80 notes
jocurr:

Jonathan Curry

jocurr:

Jonathan Curry

Sep 14, 2014
149 notes
jocurr:

Jonathan Curry

jocurr:

Jonathan Curry

Sep 14, 2014
16 notes
Sep 14, 2014
341 notes
pamelamakin:



Willy Guhl / Loop chair

pamelamakin:

Willy Guhl / Loop chair

(via gregoutthere)

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About
I am an artist living in an isolated community in BC, Canada. This blog is a collection of my work and the images, work and ideas of others that I find pleasing. Tumblr is my window into a kindred world I did not know existed. THANK-YOU. Subscribe via RSS.